Park People

IMG_7640Park People // Nathan Sawaya

Artist Nathan Sawaya created six sculptures made out of a toy known worldwide — LEGOS. The sculptures were titled “Park People.” The monochrome LEGO people were seated on various benches in downtown Los Angeles. Sitting in a variety of poses, the sculptures encouraged a passerby to sit along side them and interact with public art. 

IMG_7636

IMG_7637

IMG_7644

Bloomsbury Art & Design

FullSizeRender 8Self-Portrait // Roger Fry // oil on canvas // 1928

In 1900s London a group of artists and academics became known as the Boomsbury Group. Those affiliated with the group worked together on a variety of projects including those relating to art. Artist members included Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and Roger Fry and abstract designs was a characteristic of their artistic style. The Courtauld Institute of Art held an exhibition of the Bloomsbury Group which allowed visitors to see the juxtaposition of individual artist’s pieces next to works from other members. 

FullSizeRender 10Rug // Duncan Grant // Probably made at the Royal Wilton Carpet Factory // hand-knotted wool, jute or hemp warp // 1913 or later

FullSizeRender 17Spinet // Made by Arnold Dolmetsch, decorated by Roger Fry // oil on wood // 1918

FullSizeRender 18Plate with Sailing Boat Design // Duncan Grant // earthenware, painted overglaze, ‘Ω” painted on base // 1913

FullSizeRender 20Screen with Lily Pond Design // Duncan Grant // oil on wood // 1913-1914

FullSizeRender 29Rug Design // Attributed to Vanessa Bell // gouache and pencil on paper // 1913-1914

Becoming America

IMG_5895What do you think of when you hear “American art?”  Portraits of our founding fathers? American flags? The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens has an exhibition dedicated to showing art from the early United States titled “Becoming America.” Located in the Scott Galleries the works include paintings, furniture, spinning wheels and quilts and are all from the private collection of Jonathan and Karin Fielding. 

IMG_5930

IMG_5926

IMG_5893

Amber Goldhammer

FullSizeRender 33.jpgEver see graffiti on the street and wish you could take it home? Amber Goldhammer’s art allows you to take graffiti home. Her canvas are filled with graffiti style words and phrases in bold colors and in black and white. Looking at her work becomes almost a scavenger hunt where you are researching for words and faces through the overlaid color. One of her new series is “I Love You,” where the phrase repeats over and over again all over the canvas. 

FullSizeRender 45

FullSizeRender 16

Good Fences Make Good Neighbors

IMG_8066“Good fences make good neighbors” // Ai Weiwei // Photographs by Erin Fong

Ai Weiwei’s latest public work in New York City was a large fence resembling a bird cage centered in the middle of the Washington Square Arch. Visitors who wished to pass under the arc had to walk through the fence. But, once inside the arch, you are also in the middle of a cage. Trapped in the Washington Square Arch. You can of course walk out the cage, but the feeling of entrapment stays. The theme of freedom lost is frequently addressed in Ai Weiwei’s work, though this one allows for the audience to play an active roll in understanding the meaning of his work. 

IMG_8068“Good fences make good neighbors” // Ai Weiwei // Photographs by Erin Fong

 

 

Street Art Palms

FullSizeRender 28 copy.jpg

A gray electrical box on the sidewalk. Sounds boring right? Well, there is a current trend that is changing people’s perception of electrical boxes. In various cities in Los Angeles, such as Culver City, artists are using these seemingly ordinary objects as a blank canvas for their works. Painted in vibrant colors and varying designs, these boxes are becoming public works of art. Check out this one from Palms in Culver City. At a block party the public was invited to paint their handprints making this not only an artistic work of art but a communal one as well. 

FullSizeRender 46

399 Days

FullSizeRender 2399 Days // Rachel Kneebone // 2014 // Porcelain

In a room of historical sculptures in the V&A,  one seems to not quite fit in. Well, that is because it was made in 2014 by British artist Rachel Kneebone. This towering porcelain structure is composed of intricately carved figures. The depth Kneebone was able to achieve in her carvings allows light to penetrate through, illuminating the figures’ movement. The placement of this work in a gallery of Renaissance sculptures provides for a unique juxtaposition of 16th century and 21st century sculptures. 

FullSizeRender 3399 Days // Rachel Kneebone // 2014 // Porcelain

FullSizeRender399 Days // Rachel Kneebone // 2014 // Porcelain

The Color Inside

f.jpgThe Color Inside // James Turrell // Black basalt, plaster & LED lights // 2013 

I love James Turrell and his Skyspaces. Whenever I have a chance to experience one I go, even if it is a bit out of the way. So when I was in Austin I knew I had to go to Turrell’s “The Color Inside” at University of Texas at Austin. Located on the rooftop of UT Austin’s Student Activity Center, this Skyspace marks Turrell’s 84th. As visitors enter the oval structure they are invited to sit on the bench that juts out from the wall. If you sit down, you find yourself in a reclining position which provides optimal viewing of the oval hole in the ceiling. Lights slowly change color, juxtaposing against the color of the sky. If you reserve a spot in advance you are able to watch the sun set whilst sitting in this Skypsace which provides for a unique viewing experience.

Street Art Austin

g.jpg

It is only fitting that in the hip and trendy city of Austin, Texas there is no shortage of street art. Large, colorful murals adorn the streets which seem to exude life into this bustling city. Some of Austin’s street art has become so popular that not only are they marked on Google Maps, but there are stands next to the work of art signaling people where to stand in line. This is due to the crowds of people ready to take selfies. The “I love you so much” work has one of those signs. I was lucky enough to only have to wait behind two groups of people before it was my turn. 

IMG_0911.jpg

a

f.jpg

s.jpg

d

 

Tate Britain

IMG_7208.JPGThe History of the World // Jeremy Deller // graphite & acrylic paint on wall // 1997-2004

In my most recent visit to Tate Britain, I discovered works I had never seen before. These were some that I found most striking.  

FullSizeRender 15Sunil Gupta

FullSizeRender 12Chair // Allen Jones // acrylic paint on glass fibre & resin with Perspex & leather // 1969

FullSizeRender 11Blue Devils // Chris Ofili // oil paint & charcoal on canvas // 2014

FullSizeRender 10Portrait of David Hockney in a Hollywood Spanish Interior // Peter Blake // acrylic paint, graphite & ink on canvas // 1965

FullSizeRender 7.jpgDying King // Elisabeth Frink // bronze // 1963

FullSizeRender 5No Woman, No Cry // Chris Ofili // oil paint, acrylic paint, graphite, polyester resin, printed paper, glitter, map pins & elephant dung on canvas