All posts by artomgblog

Monotones

IMG_9631.jpgSilke Otto-Knapp’s grisaille watercolors were inspired by the choreography of Frederick Ashton’s ballet. The figures represented in Otto-Knapp’s “Monotones” move with fluidity, resembling a ballerina dancing on the stage. These large scale watercolor canvases demand presence and grace, a shared characteristic with ballet.

IMG_9632Monotones (Seascape), 73 by 244 (4) // Silke Otto-Knapp // watercolor/canvas // 2016

IMG_9633Monotones (Figures and groups), 73 by 183 (3) //Silke Otto-Knapp // watercolor/canvas // 2016

IMG_9634Monotones (March), 73 by 61 // Silke Otto-Knapp // watercolor/canvas // 2016

Nepalese Seasons

IMG_9708.jpgA recent exhibition, “Nepalese Seasons: Rain and Ritual” at The Rubin Museum of Art in NYC explored the natural element of rain in the Kathmandu Valley in Nepal. On view were works which related to the importance of rain and rain deities for both Hinduism and Buddhism.

IMG_9723Divine Ancestor Hatha Dya // gilt copper alloy // Nepal, 16th century

IMG_9710

IMG_9711Upper Section of a Torana // copper alloy; repoussé // Nepal, 1810

Picasso & Rivera

FullSizeRender.jpg-12.jpegPablo Picasso and Diego Rivera. Two artist living in different cities at the same time. What possibly could they have in common? Much more than you think. Despite Picasso living in Spain and Rivera living in Mexico, both artists were inspired by historical works (antiquities for Picasso, Mesomerica for Rivera) yet developed styles of 20th century modernism unique to them yet had remarkable similarities. Cubism is one such style painted by Picasso and Rivera. While Picasso is best known for his work in Cubism, as he is considered one of the founders of the movement, Rivera also made great strides in his cubist pieces. This can best be exemplified in Picasso’s Man with a Pipe (Homme au chapeau melon assis dans un fauteuil) and Rivera’s Sailor at Lunch (Fusilero marino).

FullSizeRender.jpg-9Portrait of Sebastià Junyer Vidal // Pablo Picasso // oil on canvas // June 1903

FullSizeRender.jpg-8The Era (La Era) // Diego Rivera // oil on canvas // 1904

FullSizeRender.jpg-11Man with a Pipe (Homme au chapeau melon assis dans un fauteuil) // Pablo Picasso // oil on canvas // 1915

FullSizeRender.jpg-7Sailor at Lunch (Fusilero marino) // Diego Rivera // oil on canvas // 1914

FullSizeRender.jpg-10Woman in a Blue Veil (la femme au voile bleu) // Pablo Picasso // oil on canvas // Fall 1923

FullSizeRender.jpg-6(L) Seated Standard Bearer // Mexico, Aztec, Veracruz, 1250-1521 // sandstone, laminated (R) Frida’s Friend (El Amigo de Frida) // Diego Rivera // oil on canvas // 1931

 

Mother Earth

IMG_9916.jpgMother Earth // Barton Rubenstein // 2015 // 5 meters tall

Located on the banks of the Potomac River in Georgetown, D.C. is a minimalist sculpture of a face in profile by artist Barton Rubenstein. Titled “Mother Earth,” this work was unveiled on Saturday, April 29 of this year. This sculpture is the first, of many, to be part of the Mother Earth Project which according to their website is “a global environment-saving initiative celebrating sustainability.” The goal of this project is to place a “Mother Earth” sculpture in countries all around the world that have addressed the need for sustainability. By the end of 2017 there will be a “Mother Earth” work in Benin, Cameroon, Germany, Israel and Italy. The sculptures will be placed near rivers and oceans, uniting them through flowing water. If a country wishes to receive a sculpture they can apply for one on the Untied Nations website by detailing their sustainability and environmental practices.

Orchids: A Moment

IMG_9989.jpgThe Hirshhorn Museum of Art had an interesting exhibition on view last month. Surprisingly it was not an art exhibition. Instead it was a showcase of orchids. The Smithsonian Gardens Orchid Collection contains over 8,000 different types of orchids, a selection of which were exhibited. A grid wall display contained niches to hold the orchid vases and tv screens displayed time-lapse videos of orchids blooming.

IMG_9994.jpg

IMG_9992

IMG_9990

 

The Museum of Neon Art

b.JPGThe Museum of Neon Art recently moved from downtown Los Angeles to its new home in Glendale, CA. In addition to the museum’s temporary exhibitions, three famous neon works are on permanent view: “Pep Boys: Manny, Moe, & Jack,” “Green Frog Market Howdy Folks,” and “Hillcrest Laundry” sign. The “Green Frog Market Howdy Folks” sign was originally a supermarket sign in Bakersfield while the “Pep Boys” sign was on view until 1990 when the logo changed to remove the cigar from Manny’s mouth.

FullSizeRender 2

FullSizeRender 4Green Frog Market “Howdy Folks” // 1930s

FullSizeRender 3Pep Boys: Manny, Moe, & Jack // 1970s

FullSizeRenderHillcrest Laundry // 1950s

Museum of Ice Cream

FullSizeRender 4 copy.jpgWho doesn’t love ice cream? And a museum dedicated to ice cream? Well guess what, there is such a thing. It is called The Museum of Ice Cream and it has officially come to LA! Each room of the museum is dedicated to a different aspect of ice cream – from local creameries, to gummy bears, to sherbet, to banana splits to a sprinkles pool. Various artists created immersive installations inspired by ice cream. Artists include Abel Bentin, Baker’s Son, Drew Billiau and David Guinn, Jourdan Joly, Lizzie Darden and Ramzy Masri. My favorite room, the sprinkles pool.

FullSizeRender 4

FullSizeRender 9.jpg

FullSizeRender 15.jpg

FullSizeRender 14LOLLi SWiM

FullSizeRender 8

FullSizeRender 7Abel Bentin

FullSizeRender 6Mario Marsicano // Jellio

FullSizeRender 10Baker’s Son

Jason Rhoades

FullSizeRender 6 copy 3.jpgTijuanatanjierchandelier // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 2006

In an immersive exhibition of six installations is “Jason Rhoades: Installations, 1994-2006” at Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles. Each room is composed of one installation. Visitors are allowed to walk through the installations. In some of the rooms the blue print drawings of the work are on view, showing the artistic process of Rhoades. His works are politically charged relating to issues of stereotypes of cultures and women. My favorite work is “My Madinah. In pursuit of my ermitage…” The interactive installation pays homage to Rhoades’s own pilgrimage from Los Angeles to Mecca, California. This work resembles a temple and a mosque as it provides a critical commentary on how society perceives temples and mosques. The floor is made of overlaid towels held together with what appears to be drizzled glue. Visitors are invited to walk barefoot across the floor, seeing the work from different angels. Various ceramic objects, a box and a stool are located on the carpet. Suspended from the ceiling are 240 neon lights with crude phrases for female genitalia such as “magic cave,” “tuna taco,” “pussy” and “hot rocket.”

FullSizeRender 4Tijuanatanjierchandelier // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 2006

FullSizeRender 6 copySwedish Erotica and Fiero Parts // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 1994

FullSizeRender 7 copySwedish Erotica and Fiero Parts // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 1994

aMy Brother / Brancuzi // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 1995

aaMy Brother / Brancuzi // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 1995

FullSizeRender 6 copy 2The Creation Myth // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 1998

sdfThe Black Pussy…and the Pagon Idol Workshop // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 2005

dThe Black Pussy…and the Pagon Idol Workshop // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 2005

eMy Madinah. In pursuit of my ermitage… // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 2004

ee

My Madinah. In pursuit of my ermitage… // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 2004

FullSizeRender 7 copy 2

My Madinah. In pursuit of my ermitage… // Jason Rhoades // mixed media // 2004

 

Marvel

oReversing Service (Oreo) // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex // 38.1 x 28.1 x 5.1 cm

Kendall Carter addresses relevant themes of race and identity in a new body of work shown at Edward Cella Art & Architecture in an exhibition titled “Marvel.” Perhaps one of the most powerful works is “Cranes for Solange,” where Carter displays white denim jeans hanging on hooks that are locked. Above the jeans is a bathroom sign that states “Rest Rooms,” “White” and “Colored.” This site specific installation harks back to a dark time in history whilst simultaneously illustrating the problems that still exist.

pCranes for Solange // Kendell Carter // 2017 // denim jeans, lightbox, ephemera, locks, brackets

ooEffigy for a New Normalcy VI (Accepting Greatness) // Kendell Carter // 2017 // gold-plated sneakers

lFrom left to right (1) Waves for My People // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 71.8 x 57.8 x 5.1 (2) Thai Waves in Scandinavia // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 101 x 85.1 x 5.1 (3) Waves for Breakfast // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 118.8 x 95.9 x 5.1 cm (4) Waves on Beverly // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in fame // 129.5 x 88.9 x 5.1 cm (5) Dirty Waves // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 137.2 x 121.9 x 5.1 cm (6) Waves for Amit // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 153.7 x 125.1 x 5.1 cm (7) Waves for McQueen // Kendell Carter // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 203.2 x 143.5 x 5.1 cm

Man with a Briefcase

IMG_9810.jpgMan with a Briefcase // Jonathan Borofsky // COR-TEN steel // 1979-1988

A colossal statue of a 27 foot tall man sporting a hat and carrying a briefcase is located outside the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington D.C. This figure resembles the classic image of a typical salesman, walking door to door. This subject is a reoccurring theme by Borofsky, seen in other large scale statues in cities such as Forth Worth, TX and Minneapolis, MN. This particular statue is a newly acquired work by SAAM.