Category Archives: OMG

Oh My God

The Untitled Swing Project

IMG_8721.JPGThe Untitled Swing Project // Rula Yaghmour, Dina Haddadin, Moar Al-Zo’bi & Rand El Haj Hasan // Arini Creative Platforms // Photograph by Alexa Corbin

Visitors had the opportunity to swing into the art world in an interactive installation by Rula Yaghmour, Dina Haddadin, Moar Al-Zo’bi & Rand El Haj Hasan for the 2015 Dubai Design Week. Various countries in the Middle East had pavilions which showcased innovative art and designs. The swings, fittingly titled “The Untitled Swing Project,” was part of the Jordan Pavilion. Swings allow people to feel weightless and free, evoking a feeling childhood innocence. The swings were all connected  by white beams, whilst the seats were made of stone from Palestine and Jordan.

The Gateway at CityCenter

IMG_9847.jpgDavid Niles

Three colossal high definition screens form a 25 foot hight, 50 foot long archway in Washington DC. The entrance to an apartment complex, this work of art was created by David Niles. The screens display a variety of subjects such as elephants, bubbles, astronauts and in this photograph geometric designs. The images are accompanied by music. This, however, is no ordinary video work. Instead of having images on a constant loop, the video changes with the number of people walking through the arch. For example, if bubbles are on the screen, the number of bubbles shown will increase, as well as the music volume, if there are a lot of people walking through. When I visited there was only a handful of people, so it was pretty quite and the geometric patterns changed slowly.

IMG_9846David Niles

The Effect of Lightning on a Rainbow

iNight Flower (From Left to Right Blue, White & Pink) // Masood Kamandy // 2017 // dye-sublimation print on aluminum // 24 x 18 inches // edition 3

The world is filled with photographers. Everyone with a smart phone is a photographer whether they consider themselves to be one or not. Smartphones are something the average person carries with them everywhere. They use the camera, along with numerous photo editing apps, to document their lives in snapshots. Artist Masood Kamandy recognizes the importance of photographs in this smartphone generation. In a recent body of work, Kamandy created and designed his own photography app for the iPhone called “Oblique.” The app is available for download in the Apple App store for $1.99. The app essentially combines all photo processing into one step, compressing the image and causing the photographs to have distorted colors that swirl and blend. Some of his photographs were on view in Luis De Jesus Los Angeles Gallery in Culver City. Curious, I downloaded the app and decided to play around with some of my photographs. I took a snap of my backyard then used the filter features to warp my photo. The last three images are ones I created.

xHorizon (Dark) // Masood Kamandy // 2017 // dye-sublimation print on aluminum, 3 panels (triptych) // 16 x 12 inches each // edition of 3

uPurple // Masood Kamandy // 2017 // dye-sublimation print on aluminum // 36 x 27 in // edition of 3

eShear Matrix (White) // Masood Kamandy // 2017 // dye-sublimation print on aluminum // 24 x 18 inches // edition of 3

Tiffany X Whitney Biennial

IMG_6333.JPG.jpegPhotograph by Erin Fong

This past March was the Tiffany X Whitney Biennial curated by Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks. The exhibition, which took place at Tiffany’s Fifth Avenue store in New York City, consisted of works by five artists who participated in the Whitney Biennial: Harold Mendez, Shara Hughes, Ajay Kurian, Raúl de Nieves and Carrie Moyer. Each artist worked with a Tiffany designer to blend Tiffany’s style with a contemporary work of art. Mendez created a sterling silver death mask. Hughes painted landscapes on a bone China pitcher which rotated under a light, allowing for different views of the pitcher to be illuminated at different times of the day. Kurian made sterling silver card holders with intricate designs and phrases, such as the word ‘PSYCHO.” Nives work consisted of detailed etched glass and Moyer made an installation for the front window.

IMG_6327.JPGPhotograph by Erin Fong

IMG_6328.JPGWinter Wonderland // Photograph by Erin Fong

IMG_6329.JPGSculptural Still Life // Photograph by Erin Fong

IMG_6331.JPGModern Secrets // Ajay Kurian // Card case in sterling silver featuring a stereogram hiding the word “PSYCHO” // Photograph by Erin Fong

IMG_6326.JPGRemote Twilight // Shara Hughes // abstract landscape hand painted on bone China pitcher // Photograph by Erin Fong

RAD

FullSizeRender 25.jpgA one mile street in Asheville, North Carolina is home to over 220 artist studios and galleries. Know as the River Arts District (RAD), this area presents works by artists such as the Pink Dog Creative, Sarah Sneeden and Jeff Pittman and showcases a variety of media from furniture, to photography to oil painting. Here are a few of my favorite pieces.

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FullSizeRender 24Jeff Pittman

FullSizeRender 21Cowboy Marshall // Kora Manheimer // Digital C-print // North Carolina 2003

FullSizeRender 20Sarah Sneeden

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FullSizeRender 17Linnea Heide

FullSizeRender 14Exposed: Revealing the Music in my Head // Julia Goldthwaite // Oil paintings & processes

FullSizeRender 13Exposed: Revealing the Music in my Head // Julia Goldthwaite // Oil paintings & processes

FullSizeRender 10Jeff Pittman

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FullSizeRender 7Sarah Sneeden

FullSizeRender 4Pink Dog Creative

Shafted

FullSizeRender.jpg-15.jpegUntitled (Shafted) // Barbara Kruger // digital-print installation // 2008

Who knew riding in a elevator you could experience a work of art. In an enormous glass elevator at LACMA visitors have the opportunity to view a digital-print installation by Barbara Kruger. As the elevator ascends and descends riders catch glimpses of text, however the elevator car blocks words, compromising the entirety of the phrase. Kruger is known for juxtaposing imagery and phrases from everyday life, leaving the viewer to question the intended meaning.

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Glitter World

FullSizeRender 7.jpgGraphic and fashion designer Nora Quinn recently launched a new artistic brand: Glamchop LA. Using a variety of fragmented materials in different colors, Quinn creates an assemblage work of art she calls “Glitter World.” This particular “Glitter World” piece can be found sprawling across the walls in Culver City’s ice cream shop Scoops where it provides a burst of glittery color to visitors while they munch on their frozen treats.

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Alliance Française

IMG_1599Valérie Daval

Recently on view at the Alliance Française Pasadena studio was a series of of paintings by Valérie Daval. Circular and square canvases were home to swirls of color. Daval’s abstract style blends colors in such a way that the paintings appear as a beautiful sunset.

IMG_1600Valérie Daval

The Art of Plasma

a.jpgPangea Plasma Planet // Bernd Weinmayer // 2016 // Borosilicate glass filled with gas & made in collaboration with Gerhard Hochmuth

There are four states of matter: solid, liquid, gas and plasma. At least for me, plasma is the one state of matter I understand the least. So I found the exhibition, “The Art of Plasma” at the Museum of Neon Art particularly interesting. Plasma, as defined on the exhibition’s wall label,” is “a collection of charge particles containing about an equal number of positive ions and electrons and exhibiting some properties of a gas but differing from a gas in being a good conductor of electricity and being affected by a magnetic field.” In an effort to simply this definition, an example of plasma is the Aurora Borealis [aka the Northern Lights]. So in this group exhibition various artists displayed works created with plasma. This show will definitely illuminate your view of neon art.

ddReddy Kilowatt // Larry Albright // 2009

dAnemone // Candice Gawne // 2000 // Uranium & borosilicate glass filled with neon and argon gas and mercury

sssssss(L) Emergent #3 Response (M) Emergent #1 Growth (R) Emergent #5 Structure // Wayne Strattm // Flameworked borosilicate glass, phosphors, krypton/iodine fill gas

sdfd(L) Mesmer #2 Gas Giant (M) Mesmer #1 Primitives (R) Mesmer #2 EM Color Fields // Wayne Strattm // Flameworked borosilicate glass, custom phosphor “paints,” inert gas & electronic power supply

sCognizance Network // Eric Franklin // 2014

The Moving Portrait

IMG_9900.jpgFour Hands // Bill Viola // Black-and-white video polyptych on four LCD flat panels, continuously running // 2001

“The Moving Portrait,” an exhibition dedicated to media and video works by Bill Viola, were on view in the National Portrait Gallery in the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Viola uses events from the past, both historical and personal, to create his works. “The Raft,” was inspired by Theodore Gericault’s 1818-1819 “The Raft of the Medusa,” which depicted a French shipwreck near Senegal in 1816. However, instead of a raft of shipwrecked men, Viola shows men and women being knocked down by crashing water. As they rise the water comes and knocks them down again. This video projection was made for the 2004 Athens Olympics. While this work was inspired by a historical event and a past painting, “The Dreamers” was influenced by Viola’s near-drowning as a child. This work consists of seven video screens of seven individuals suspended in water. One of the individuals is Viola himself.

IMG_9897The Raft // Bill Viola // Color high-definition video projection 5.1 channels of surround sound, duration: 10:33 minutes // 2004

IMG_9894The Dreamers // Bill Viola // Seven channels of color high-definition video on seven plasma displays: four channels of stereo sound, continuously running // Performers (L) Gleb Kaminer (R)Rebekah Rife // 2013