Roy Colmer

IMG_9603.jpgUntitled #49 // Roy Colmer // acrylic on canvas // 1970 // 190.5 x 127 cm

1960s NYC artist Roy Colmer utilized a spray gun to create works of art which blend colors. The sprayed colors consist of one colored canvas with a different color sprayed down the middle. The strips appear to vibrate, reflecting movement and flickering of video screens. This tribute to technology is a common theme throughout Colmer’s artistic practice.

IMG_9600Untitled #118 // Roy Colmer // acrylic on canvas // 1968 // 127 x 127 cm

FullSizeRender.jpgUntitled #57 // Roy Colmer // acrylic on canvas // 177.8 x 127 cm

Reclining Figure

IMG_3525.JPGReclining Figure – 1981 // Henry Moore

Reclining outside the Segerstrom Center for the Arts is a figure of a man. With a head far too small for his body it can only be the work of the famed British sculptor Henry Moore. Donated to the Segerstrom by the Angels of the Art on June 11, 1984, this work titled “Reclining Figure – 1981,” greets visitors as they approach the entrance to the art center.

RAD

FullSizeRender 25.jpgA one mile street in Asheville, North Carolina is home to over 220 artist studios and galleries. Know as the River Arts District (RAD), this area presents works by artists such as the Pink Dog Creative, Sarah Sneeden and Jeff Pittman and showcases a variety of media from furniture, to photography to oil painting. Here are a few of my favorite pieces.

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FullSizeRender 24Jeff Pittman

FullSizeRender 21Cowboy Marshall // Kora Manheimer // Digital C-print // North Carolina 2003

FullSizeRender 20Sarah Sneeden

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FullSizeRender 17Linnea Heide

FullSizeRender 14Exposed: Revealing the Music in my Head // Julia Goldthwaite // Oil paintings & processes

FullSizeRender 13Exposed: Revealing the Music in my Head // Julia Goldthwaite // Oil paintings & processes

FullSizeRender 10Jeff Pittman

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FullSizeRender 7Sarah Sneeden

FullSizeRender 4Pink Dog Creative

Shafted

FullSizeRender.jpg-15.jpegUntitled (Shafted) // Barbara Kruger // digital-print installation // 2008

Who knew riding in a elevator you could experience a work of art. In an enormous glass elevator at LACMA visitors have the opportunity to view a digital-print installation by Barbara Kruger. As the elevator ascends and descends riders catch glimpses of text, however the elevator car blocks words, compromising the entirety of the phrase. Kruger is known for juxtaposing imagery and phrases from everyday life, leaving the viewer to question the intended meaning.

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Zachary Armstrong Keith

v.jpgIn a tight hang, Zachary Armstrong’s “Keith’s Paintings,” were shown in China Art Objects gallery in Culver City. Armstrong’s paintings combine childhood imagination with adult themes to create a complex painting. Unicorns and flower crowns coupled with grimaces and menacing faces with tongues sticking out are juxtaposed  in Armstrong’s works. He even painted a work of art specifically for the exhibition, a painting that states his name, title of the show and location.

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OM Lab

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Did you happen to drop by the Rubin Museum of Art in NYC earlier this year? If so, did you take part in the OM Lab? The OM Lab was a cube recording studio where visitors were invited to enter and record their own “OM” meditation chant. All of the recordings were compiled and played in the exhibition “The World is Sound,” which started in June. The meditation sound “OM” [phonetically pronounced A-U-M] has been practiced for over 3,000 years for meditation, yoga and music. So stop by the Rubins to listen to this meditative musical work of art.

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Glitter World

FullSizeRender 7.jpgGraphic and fashion designer Nora Quinn recently launched a new artistic brand: Glamchop LA. Using a variety of fragmented materials in different colors, Quinn creates an assemblage work of art she calls “Glitter World.” This particular “Glitter World” piece can be found sprawling across the walls in Culver City’s ice cream shop Scoops where it provides a burst of glittery color to visitors while they munch on their frozen treats.

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Alliance Française

IMG_1599Valérie Daval

Recently on view at the Alliance Française Pasadena studio was a series of of paintings by Valérie Daval. Circular and square canvases were home to swirls of color. Daval’s abstract style blends colors in such a way that the paintings appear as a beautiful sunset.

IMG_1600Valérie Daval

The Art of Plasma

a.jpgPangea Plasma Planet // Bernd Weinmayer // 2016 // Borosilicate glass filled with gas & made in collaboration with Gerhard Hochmuth

There are four states of matter: solid, liquid, gas and plasma. At least for me, plasma is the one state of matter I understand the least. So I found the exhibition, “The Art of Plasma” at the Museum of Neon Art particularly interesting. Plasma, as defined on the exhibition’s wall label,” is “a collection of charge particles containing about an equal number of positive ions and electrons and exhibiting some properties of a gas but differing from a gas in being a good conductor of electricity and being affected by a magnetic field.” In an effort to simply this definition, an example of plasma is the Aurora Borealis [aka the Northern Lights]. So in this group exhibition various artists displayed works created with plasma. This show will definitely illuminate your view of neon art.

ddReddy Kilowatt // Larry Albright // 2009

dAnemone // Candice Gawne // 2000 // Uranium & borosilicate glass filled with neon and argon gas and mercury

sssssss(L) Emergent #3 Response (M) Emergent #1 Growth (R) Emergent #5 Structure // Wayne Strattm // Flameworked borosilicate glass, phosphors, krypton/iodine fill gas

sdfd(L) Mesmer #2 Gas Giant (M) Mesmer #1 Primitives (R) Mesmer #2 EM Color Fields // Wayne Strattm // Flameworked borosilicate glass, custom phosphor “paints,” inert gas & electronic power supply

sCognizance Network // Eric Franklin // 2014

Van Gogh’s Bedroom

FullSizeRender 3.jpgThe Bedroom // Vincent Van Gogh // oil on canvas // September 1998

Van Gogh, known to be inspired by his surroundings, featured a bedroom in Arles, France. In fact, Van Gogh depicted this bedroom three times. Now the paintings are dispersed around the world, one on view at the Vincent Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, another on at the Musée d’Orsay in Paris and the final work  at the Art Institute of Chicago. “The Bedroom,” from the Art Institute of Chicago, is the second version Van Gogh painted and was recently loaned to the Norton Simon. In “The Bedroom,” Van Gogh turned the floor green, the walls purple and created a perspective that plays with the viewer’s perception.

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