Tag Archives: FYI

Marvel

oReversing Service (Oreo) // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex // 38.1 x 28.1 x 5.1 cm

Kendall Carter addresses relevant themes of race and identity in a new body of work shown at Edward Cella Art & Architecture in an exhibition titled “Marvel.” Perhaps one of the most powerful works is “Cranes for Solange,” where Carter displays white denim jeans hanging on hooks that are locked. Above the jeans is a bathroom sign that states “Rest Rooms,” “White” and “Colored.” This site specific installation harks back to a dark time in history whilst simultaneously illustrating the problems that still exist.

pCranes for Solange // Kendell Carter // 2017 // denim jeans, lightbox, ephemera, locks, brackets

ooEffigy for a New Normalcy VI (Accepting Greatness) // Kendell Carter // 2017 // gold-plated sneakers

lFrom left to right (1) Waves for My People // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 71.8 x 57.8 x 5.1 (2) Thai Waves in Scandinavia // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 101 x 85.1 x 5.1 (3) Waves for Breakfast // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 118.8 x 95.9 x 5.1 cm (4) Waves on Beverly // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in fame // 129.5 x 88.9 x 5.1 cm (5) Dirty Waves // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 137.2 x 121.9 x 5.1 cm (6) Waves for Amit // Kendell Carter // 2017 // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 153.7 x 125.1 x 5.1 cm (7) Waves for McQueen // Kendell Carter // cast latex & aerosol float mounted in frame // 203.2 x 143.5 x 5.1 cm

Dieter Roth, Björn Roth

FullSizeRender 6.jpgSeydisfjördur Slides – Every View of a Town 1988-1995

In the Book & Printed Matter Lab at Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles is a display of photographs from the Icelandic town of Seydisfjördur. The photographs are not displayed in the traditional manner of ink on paper, rather the photographs are shown on the wall by four projectors. Created by Dieter Roth, his two sons Björn and Karl and Pal Magnússon, the photographs depict the Icelandic landscape, houses and roads. In an adjacent display are notes and the original photographic prints, allowing visitors to see the archived materials.

FullSizeRender 4Seydisfjördur Slides – Every View of a Town 1988-1995

FullSizeRender 8Seydisfjördur Slides – Every View of a Town 1988-1995

FullSizeRender 7Seydisfjördur Slides – Every View of a Town 1988-1995

Jonas Gerard

FullSizeRender 3.jpgThe Asheville Regional Airport created a mini gallery to showcase one artist who practices in Asheville’s River Arts District [RAD]. Right now the airport gallery is exhibiting the art of Jonas Gerard. Born in Morocco, Gerard lived in New York City and now currently resides in Asheville, North Carolina. Despite living in North Carolina, Gerard remains influenced by New York and Morocco. While painting, Gerard listens to Moroccan tribal music, Afro-Cuban rhythms and jazz, allowing the melodies to inspire him.

FullSizeRender 4.jpgOur Beautiful World #2 // Jonas Gerard // acrylic on canvas // 30 x 48”

FullSizeRender 2.jpgEnchanted Forest #3 // Jonas Gerard // acrylic on canvas // 36 x 72”

FullSizeRender 6Floral Fantasy #23 // Jonas Gerard // acrylic on canvas // 20 x 20”

Hauser & Wirth LA

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London, Somerset, Gstaad, New York. Now Los Angeles. These are the locations of the internationally renowned gallery Hauser & Wirth. Their latest gallery, in Los Angeles, opened last year in the arts district. In an open design concept, the gallery consists of individual rooms to showcase art, an outdoor courtyard, bookstore and restaurant. The restaurant, Manuela, is farm to table, and is equipped with a chicken coop and herb and vegetable garden.

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FullSizeRender 7Pacific Ocean // Mary Heilmann // acrylic paint // 2016

FullSizeRender 8Pacific Ocean // Mary Heilmann // acrylic paint // 2016

Our View From Here

IMG_0085Our View From Here // Linn Meyer

Swirling on the second floor of the Hirshhorn Museum is the site-specific drawing “Our View from Here” by Linn Meyer.  For this piece Meyer drew directly onto the wall of the gallery, creating a total of 400 linear feet. As visitors walk around the gallery their perspective of the work changes, the drawing spirals and twirls around the circular gallery space. Interested in seeing Meyer’s drawing process? Check out this time-lapse of her working: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYPwZv2Ul0M

IMG_0086Our View From Here // Linn Meyer

Katharina Grosse

IMG_9645.jpgUntitled // Katharina Grosse // acrylic on canvas // 2016 // 299 x 203 cm (unframed)

Berlin based artist Katharina Grosse recently exhibited her latest body of work at Gagosian Gallery in NYC. Grosse paints large canvases with a spray bottle. She does not plan where to apply paint, rather she paints in the moment. In addition to canvases Grosse also showcased a 3-dimensional work of acrylic on aluminum in which she applies paint in the same spontaneous style as her canvas pieces.

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IMG_9653Untitled // Katharina Grosse // acrylic on canvas // 2016 // 376 x 201 cm

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Untitled // Katharina Grosse // acrylic on aluminum // 2016 // 74.5 x 171 x 409 cm // 1 of 3 unique versions plus 1AP

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Untitled // Katharina Grosse // acrylic on canvas // 2016 // 290 x 193 cm (unframed)

Skerts

IMG_9529.jpgSkerts // Laleh Khorramian

Three brilliantly colored flowing cloaks were recently on view in tANJA gRUNERT in NYC. Created for this exhibition, these dyed fabrics are part of a new body of work where Khorramian explores fabrics and clothing design. The flowing nature of these robes resemble traditional Chinese robes blended with modern pigments and abstract forms.

IMG_9530Skerts // Laleh Khorramian

Days and Nights, Lemons

sScene with Sliced Bread, Sundown // Holly Coulis // 2017 // oil on linen // 30.13 x 24 in

“Days and Nights, Lemons” is the title of a recent show of work by Holly Coulis in Cherry and Martin Gallery. In this body of work various still life scenes are painted on linen. Images of wine bottles, glasses, fruits and utensils are some of the main subjects. These objects are characteristic of traditional Dutch still life paintings from the 1600s. Here Coulis creates a modern still life through bold colors and stylized forms.

ssKnife, Potatoes (for French Fries), Bowls // Holly Coulis // 2017 // oil on linen // 30.13 x 36.13 in

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Water at Night // Holly Coulis // 2017 // oil on linen // 22 x 19 in

Kishio Suga

IMG_9570Accumulated Phases // Kishio Suga // paper, stone & earth // 1979/2016

Combining natural objects such as stones and earth with man-made objects such as metal and vinyl, Kishio Suga creates works that question man’s relationship with the natural world. As one of the founders of the Japanese movement Mono-ha (School of Things), some of Suga’s minimalist pieces appear to transformational. For instance, the installation of Diagonal Phase is dependent on the height of the gallery, allowing the work to appear differently each time it is displayed.

IMG_9576Placement of Condition // Kishio Suga // stone & wire // 1973/2016

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Diagonal Phase // Kishio Suga // wood & stone // 1969/2012

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Accumulated Effects // Kishio Suga // stone & vinyl // 1979/2016

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Law of Halted Space // Kishio Suga // wood & metal // 2016

Mourning Flags

IMG_9525Mourning Flag 3 // Paul Jacobsen // charcoal on paper with charred frame // 2017

In a time of uncertainty, where women, the LGBTQ community and civil liberties are being questioned, artist Paul Jacobsen has created a series of works to express his emotional response to these issues. Titled “Mourning Flags,” Jacobsen used charcoal to draw abstract representations of flags in various positions to address the current state of events. The pieces encourage onlookers to stop, reflect, or in Jacobsen’s case, mourn.

IMG_9526Mourning Flag 2 // Paul Jacobsen // charcoal on paper with charred frame // 2017