Tag Archives: London

Bloomsbury Art & Design

FullSizeRender 8Self-Portrait // Roger Fry // oil on canvas // 1928

In 1900s London a group of artists and academics became known as the Boomsbury Group. Those affiliated with the group worked together on a variety of projects including those relating to art. Artist members included Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and Roger Fry and abstract designs was a characteristic of their artistic style. The Courtauld Institute of Art held an exhibition of the Bloomsbury Group which allowed visitors to see the juxtaposition of individual artist’s pieces next to works from other members. 

FullSizeRender 10Rug // Duncan Grant // Probably made at the Royal Wilton Carpet Factory // hand-knotted wool, jute or hemp warp // 1913 or later

FullSizeRender 17Spinet // Made by Arnold Dolmetsch, decorated by Roger Fry // oil on wood // 1918

FullSizeRender 18Plate with Sailing Boat Design // Duncan Grant // earthenware, painted overglaze, ‘Ω” painted on base // 1913

FullSizeRender 20Screen with Lily Pond Design // Duncan Grant // oil on wood // 1913-1914

FullSizeRender 29Rug Design // Attributed to Vanessa Bell // gouache and pencil on paper // 1913-1914

399 Days

FullSizeRender 2399 Days // Rachel Kneebone // 2014 // Porcelain

In a room of historical sculptures in the V&A,  one seems to not quite fit in. Well, that is because it was made in 2014 by British artist Rachel Kneebone. This towering porcelain structure is composed of intricately carved figures. The depth Kneebone was able to achieve in her carvings allows light to penetrate through, illuminating the figures’ movement. The placement of this work in a gallery of Renaissance sculptures provides for a unique juxtaposition of 16th century and 21st century sculptures. 

FullSizeRender 3399 Days // Rachel Kneebone // 2014 // Porcelain

FullSizeRender399 Days // Rachel Kneebone // 2014 // Porcelain

Tate Britain

IMG_7208.JPGThe History of the World // Jeremy Deller // graphite & acrylic paint on wall // 1997-2004

In my most recent visit to Tate Britain, I discovered works I had never seen before. These were some that I found most striking.  

FullSizeRender 15Sunil Gupta

FullSizeRender 12Chair // Allen Jones // acrylic paint on glass fibre & resin with Perspex & leather // 1969

FullSizeRender 11Blue Devils // Chris Ofili // oil paint & charcoal on canvas // 2014

FullSizeRender 10Portrait of David Hockney in a Hollywood Spanish Interior // Peter Blake // acrylic paint, graphite & ink on canvas // 1965

FullSizeRender 7.jpgDying King // Elisabeth Frink // bronze // 1963

FullSizeRender 5No Woman, No Cry // Chris Ofili // oil paint, acrylic paint, graphite, polyester resin, printed paper, glitter, map pins & elephant dung on canvas 

Exhibition Road Quarter

FullSizeRender 7Exhibition Road Quarter // Amanda Levete Architects (AL_A)

The latest architectural project at the V&A museum in London was the opening of a new entrance on Exhibition Road. Created out of porcelain tile, this entrance leads to a large courtyard where people can mingle, sit for a cup of tea or walk directly to the temporary exhibitions. The use of porcelain in the design is a tribute to the V&A’s immense 19th century ceramic collection, but in a fresh and modern look. 

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Shaping Fashion

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Spanish designer Cristobal Balenciaga is known for his exquisite and elaborate fashion creations. From hats, to evening gowns to capes, Balenciaga has created quite a legacy in the fashion world. The V&A took the opportunity to showcase his pieces in an exhibition titled “Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion.” The bottom floor exhibited Balenciaga’s designs on mannequins whilst the top floor showcased articles of clothing by other designers who were influenced by him.

FullSizeRender 21(L) Regional Dress // Evening Dress // Silk organza with embroidery by Lesage // Cristóbel Balenciaga // Paris // 1960 (R) Flamenco Dancing // Evening Dress // Silk gazar // Cristóbel Balenciaga // Paris // 1962 

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FullSizeRender 16Cream Spiral Hat // Silk // Cristóbal Balenciaga (Eisa Iabel) // Spain // 1962

FullSizeRender 9Cape or Skirt? 

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FullSizeRender 25Dress // Hussein Chalyan // laser cut tulle // designed 2006, made 2011

BP Portrait Awards 2017

FullSizeRender 2Breech! // Benjamin Sullivan // oil on canvas // 1st Prize

Every year the National Portrait Gallery in London invites the public to submit portraits to be on view in the gallery in an exhibition known as the BP Portrait Awards. Last year marked the 38th year. In addition to the main show, there is a youth category called Next Generation. The 38th BP Portrait Awards had 2,580 submissions from 87 countries. Of that number, a panel of judges selected 53 to be exhibited. The following were my favorite.

FullSizeRender 4Delfin // Jesús Maria Sáez de Vicuña Ochoa // oil on board

FullSizeRender 7Simona // Lukáš Betinsky // oil on canvas

FullSizeRender 8Emma // Antony Williams // egg tempera on board // 3rd Prize

FullSizeRenderAnother Find Day on Elysian Fields Avenue, Nola // Éva Csanyi-Hurskin // oil on linen

FullSizeRender 6Archipelago // Brian Shields // acrylic on canvas behind part-mirrored glass

FullSizeRender 5Double Portrait // Thomas Ehretsmann // acrylic on board // 2nd Prize

FullSizeRender copyGabi // Henry Christian-Slane // oil on board // BP Young Artist Award

Serpentine Pavilion

FullSizeRender.jpgSerpentine Pavilion // Francis Kéré // 2017

Each summer (from 2000-2017) the Serpentine Gallery commissions an artist or architect to create a pavilion. Former designers have included Ai Weiwei, Frank Ghery, Sou Fujimoto and Jean Nouvel. The 2017 pavilion was built by Francis Kéré. Resembling a tree with a trunk-like structure in center, the 300 square meter pavilion allowed for a sitting area, a cafe and a place for educational events.

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The Whole World + The Work = The World

img_2860-1Work No. 232 the whole world + the work = the whole world // 2000 // Martin Creed // Neon lights and metal

I much prefer art to math. But I have never thought about combining art and math. But Martin Creed did. In “Work No. 232 the whole world + the work = the whole world,” Creed created an equation in neon letters. The piece, which is currently installed in Tate Modern, expresses the vast, yet inclusive nature of art. There is not necessarily one interpretation of a work of art, granting individuals to power to think of their own unique perspective.

Paradoxymoron

fullsizerender-5Paradoxymoron // Patrick Hughes // 1996

Spent all day studying and reading in the British Library? Feel like a break? Well Patrick Hughes’ “Paradoxymoron,” located on the bottom floor, provides just the quick escape you need. This illusionistic image of a library will certainly play tricks with your mind. In one moment it appears 3D, in other 2D. Which one is it?