Tag Archives: Omg

RAD

FullSizeRender 25.jpgA one mile street in Asheville, North Carolina is home to over 220 artist studios and galleries. Know as the River Arts District (RAD), this area presents works by artists such as the Pink Dog Creative, Sarah Sneeden and Jeff Pittman and showcases a variety of media from furniture, to photography to oil painting. Here are a few of my favorite pieces.

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FullSizeRender 24Jeff Pittman

FullSizeRender 21Cowboy Marshall // Kora Manheimer // Digital C-print // North Carolina 2003

FullSizeRender 20Sarah Sneeden

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FullSizeRender 17Linnea Heide

FullSizeRender 14Exposed: Revealing the Music in my Head // Julia Goldthwaite // Oil paintings & processes

FullSizeRender 13Exposed: Revealing the Music in my Head // Julia Goldthwaite // Oil paintings & processes

FullSizeRender 10Jeff Pittman

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FullSizeRender 7Sarah Sneeden

FullSizeRender 4Pink Dog Creative

Shafted

FullSizeRender.jpg-15.jpegUntitled (Shafted) // Barbara Kruger // digital-print installation // 2008

Who knew riding in a elevator you could experience a work of art. In an enormous glass elevator at LACMA visitors have the opportunity to view a digital-print installation by Barbara Kruger. As the elevator ascends and descends riders catch glimpses of text, however the elevator car blocks words, compromising the entirety of the phrase. Kruger is known for juxtaposing imagery and phrases from everyday life, leaving the viewer to question the intended meaning.

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Glitter World

FullSizeRender 7.jpgGraphic and fashion designer Nora Quinn recently launched a new artistic brand: Glamchop LA. Using a variety of fragmented materials in different colors, Quinn creates an assemblage work of art she calls “Glitter World.” This particular “Glitter World” piece can be found sprawling across the walls in Culver City’s ice cream shop Scoops where it provides a burst of glittery color to visitors while they munch on their frozen treats.

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Alliance Française

IMG_1599Valérie Daval

Recently on view at the Alliance Française Pasadena studio was a series of of paintings by Valérie Daval. Circular and square canvases were home to swirls of color. Daval’s abstract style blends colors in such a way that the paintings appear as a beautiful sunset.

IMG_1600Valérie Daval

The Art of Plasma

a.jpgPangea Plasma Planet // Bernd Weinmayer // 2016 // Borosilicate glass filled with gas & made in collaboration with Gerhard Hochmuth

There are four states of matter: solid, liquid, gas and plasma. At least for me, plasma is the one state of matter I understand the least. So I found the exhibition, “The Art of Plasma” at the Museum of Neon Art particularly interesting. Plasma, as defined on the exhibition’s wall label,” is “a collection of charge particles containing about an equal number of positive ions and electrons and exhibiting some properties of a gas but differing from a gas in being a good conductor of electricity and being affected by a magnetic field.” In an effort to simply this definition, an example of plasma is the Aurora Borealis [aka the Northern Lights]. So in this group exhibition various artists displayed works created with plasma. This show will definitely illuminate your view of neon art.

ddReddy Kilowatt // Larry Albright // 2009

dAnemone // Candice Gawne // 2000 // Uranium & borosilicate glass filled with neon and argon gas and mercury

sssssss(L) Emergent #3 Response (M) Emergent #1 Growth (R) Emergent #5 Structure // Wayne Strattm // Flameworked borosilicate glass, phosphors, krypton/iodine fill gas

sdfd(L) Mesmer #2 Gas Giant (M) Mesmer #1 Primitives (R) Mesmer #2 EM Color Fields // Wayne Strattm // Flameworked borosilicate glass, custom phosphor “paints,” inert gas & electronic power supply

sCognizance Network // Eric Franklin // 2014

The Moving Portrait

IMG_9900.jpgFour Hands // Bill Viola // Black-and-white video polyptych on four LCD flat panels, continuously running // 2001

“The Moving Portrait,” an exhibition dedicated to media and video works by Bill Viola, were on view in the National Portrait Gallery in the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Viola uses events from the past, both historical and personal, to create his works. “The Raft,” was inspired by Theodore Gericault’s 1818-1819 “The Raft of the Medusa,” which depicted a French shipwreck near Senegal in 1816. However, instead of a raft of shipwrecked men, Viola shows men and women being knocked down by crashing water. As they rise the water comes and knocks them down again. This video projection was made for the 2004 Athens Olympics. While this work was inspired by a historical event and a past painting, “The Dreamers” was influenced by Viola’s near-drowning as a child. This work consists of seven video screens of seven individuals suspended in water. One of the individuals is Viola himself.

IMG_9897The Raft // Bill Viola // Color high-definition video projection 5.1 channels of surround sound, duration: 10:33 minutes // 2004

IMG_9894The Dreamers // Bill Viola // Seven channels of color high-definition video on seven plasma displays: four channels of stereo sound, continuously running // Performers (L) Gleb Kaminer (R)Rebekah Rife // 2013

Second Avenue Subway

IMG_6265.JPG.jpegPerfect Strangers // 72nd Street // Vik Muniz // Photographs by Erin Fong

The MTA Arts & Design Department for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority commissioned four artists this year to create works of art for four metro stops in NYC. The four stations are 96th Street, 86th Street, 72nd Street and 63rd Street. Each artist used the white walls of the metro stop as a blank canvas for their art. 96 Street is designed by Sarah Sze, 86th Street by Chuck Close, 72nd Street Vik Muniz and 63rd Street by Jean Shin. These photographs are from Vik Muniz’s 72nd Street creation. Titled “Perfect Strangers,” Muniz produced 36 life size portraits of “strangers.” They resemble everyday people waiting to take the metro. The portraits include police officers, construction workers, parents and children and people dressed for work. Muniz even included himself, tripping, papers flying up in the air. So if you ever find yourself taking the metro in NYC be sure to look for these “Perfect Strangers.”

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LIFE WTR 2.0

IMG_3553.JPGSeries 2 of LIFE WTR has hit the supermarkets just in time for some hot summer weather. Series 2, Women in Art, showcases the work of three female artists: Lynnie Z, Adrienne Gaither and Trudy Benson. Lynnie Z, who lives in London, used red, blue, yellow and black to depict simplified female faces demonstrating her artistic skill as an illustrator (right). DC artist Adrienne Gaither’s creation covers the bottle with bold colors and shapes (left) while NYC artist Trudy Benson’s interest in technology is evident in her design which includes overlapping blocks of color (middle). If you are interested in learning more about the artists, their practice and their exhibitions visit the LIFE WTR website here: https://www.lifewtr.com/series/series-2/

World Time Clocks

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World Time Clocks // Bettina Pousttchi // chromogenic prints // 2008-2016

Wouldn’t it be fun to just travel the world for 8 years? Well Bettina Pousttchi did just that. In her work “World Time Clocks,” Pousttchi visited cities around the world from 2008-2016 taking photographs of public clocks. Each time she photographed a clock she did so at the same time, 2:55 pm. “World Time Clocks” is a collection of 24 photographs taken from 24 different time zones. Clocks from Los Angeles, Seoul, Moscow, Honolulu, Yangon, London, Lagona, Hong Kong and Noumea are just nine of the 24 cities represented. The placement of these works at the Hirshhorn is particularly fitting as the Hirshhorn is a circular shaped museum, which itself resembles the shape of a clock.

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