Tag Archives: Public Art

Park People

IMG_7640Park People // Nathan Sawaya

Artist Nathan Sawaya created six sculptures made out of a toy known worldwide — LEGOS. The sculptures were titled “Park People.” The monochrome LEGO people were seated on various benches in downtown Los Angeles. Sitting in a variety of poses, the sculptures encouraged a passerby to sit along side them and interact with public art. 

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Good Fences Make Good Neighbors

IMG_8066“Good fences make good neighbors” // Ai Weiwei // Photographs by Erin Fong

Ai Weiwei’s latest public work in New York City was a large fence resembling a bird cage centered in the middle of the Washington Square Arch. Visitors who wished to pass under the arc had to walk through the fence. But, once inside the arch, you are also in the middle of a cage. Trapped in the Washington Square Arch. You can of course walk out the cage, but the feeling of entrapment stays. The theme of freedom lost is frequently addressed in Ai Weiwei’s work, though this one allows for the audience to play an active roll in understanding the meaning of his work. 

IMG_8068“Good fences make good neighbors” // Ai Weiwei // Photographs by Erin Fong

 

 

Street Art Palms

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A gray electrical box on the sidewalk. Sounds boring right? Well, there is a current trend that is changing people’s perception of electrical boxes. In various cities in Los Angeles, such as Culver City, artists are using these seemingly ordinary objects as a blank canvas for their works. Painted in vibrant colors and varying designs, these boxes are becoming public works of art. Check out this one from Palms in Culver City. At a block party the public was invited to paint their handprints making this not only an artistic work of art but a communal one as well. 

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Street Art Austin

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It is only fitting that in the hip and trendy city of Austin, Texas there is no shortage of street art. Large, colorful murals adorn the streets which seem to exude life into this bustling city. Some of Austin’s street art has become so popular that not only are they marked on Google Maps, but there are stands next to the work of art signaling people where to stand in line. This is due to the crowds of people ready to take selfies. The “I love you so much” work has one of those signs. I was lucky enough to only have to wait behind two groups of people before it was my turn. 

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HOPE Outdoor Gallery

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Located in the heart of Austin is an outdoor art gallery. Specifically,  a graffiti park titled HOPE Outdoor Gallery. Okay, but what makes this one so special? Anyone over the age of 18 is eligible  to contribute to the gallery. This paint park is designed for graffiti and street artists to leave their masterpieces in the open air gallery. If you are interested in painting your own work of art at HOPE Outdoor Gallery simply email murals@hopecampaign.org to register!

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Second Avenue Subway

IMG_6265.JPG.jpegPerfect Strangers // 72nd Street // Vik Muniz // Photographs by Erin Fong

The MTA Arts & Design Department for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority commissioned four artists this year to create works of art for four metro stops in NYC. The four stations are 96th Street, 86th Street, 72nd Street and 63rd Street. Each artist used the white walls of the metro stop as a blank canvas for their art. 96 Street is designed by Sarah Sze, 86th Street by Chuck Close, 72nd Street Vik Muniz and 63rd Street by Jean Shin. These photographs are from Vik Muniz’s 72nd Street creation. Titled “Perfect Strangers,” Muniz produced 36 life size portraits of “strangers.” They resemble everyday people waiting to take the metro. The portraits include police officers, construction workers, parents and children and people dressed for work. Muniz even included himself, tripping, papers flying up in the air. So if you ever find yourself taking the metro in NYC be sure to look for these “Perfect Strangers.”

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Davis Bros Tires

yy.jpgWhen taking your car to get serviced you don’t expect to find a work of street art. However, if you go to Davis Bros Tires you will be surprised to find a mural by Kenny Scharf. Sprawling across this auto shop are cartoon-like aliens, LA city streets, fluffy clouds and even a solar system pointing out  the location of Grandpa, Bobby and Aunt Kate. This is just one of Scharf’s murals. Others can be found in NYC, Sao Paulo, Philadelphia, East Hampton and West Hollywood.

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